Constitutional Democracy in Indonesia

Editor, Melissa Crouch The Indonesian Constitution is an important legal text that governs the world’s third largest democracy. After decades of authoritarian rule, a key aspect of the transition to constitutional democracy was the amendment of the 1945 Constitution. The amended Constitution introduced profound changes to the legal and political system, including an emphasis onContinue reading “Constitutional Democracy in Indonesia”

Investing in the future of language studies by learning from the past

On 7 April, the Monash Herb Feith Indonesian Engagement Centre will host a hybrid event on the future of language studies and how we can learn from the past, with Melissa Crouch and Liam Prince. In this talk Melissa Crouch will consider the importance of mainstreaming the study of Asia as a complimentary strategy toContinue reading “Investing in the future of language studies by learning from the past”

A year on, Australia’s most unlikely political prisoner remains in jail: Sean Turnell

It has been one long year since Australian academic and economist Sean Turnell was arrested by Myanmar’s military regime. Economics advisor to Aung San Suu Kyi and Associate Professor of Macquarie University, Sean remains under detention in Myanmar. The military coup has returned the country to the horrors of direct military rule, including war, targetedContinue reading “A year on, Australia’s most unlikely political prisoner remains in jail: Sean Turnell”

Joint statement: One year after the military coup in Myanmar

*This statement is also available at UNSW, ANU , MRC, University of Sydney and Griffith Asia Institute websites On 1 February 2022, people in Myanmar will mark the first anniversary of renewed military dictatorship with protest and resistance. The coup prevented an elected government from taking office. The military extralegally detained its members, and embarkedContinue reading “Joint statement: One year after the military coup in Myanmar”

Remembering Ko Ni, 5 years on

Today marks five years since the assassination of U Ko Ni, advocate for constitutional change. His ideas take on new meaning since the coup, and are being shared by those opposing the military, like this video. My tribute to Ko Ni as Myanmar’s legal voice of conscience, written soon after his death, is here (orContinue reading “Remembering Ko Ni, 5 years on”

Seminar: Alternative Histories of Judicial Review

On 16 February I will give a seminar for the Global History Workshop (GHW), part of the Global History Lab, the Department of History, Princeton University.  In this talk I will argue for an expanded and pluralist view of histories of judicial review. I chart the itinerary of a curious constitutional invention, the constitutional writsContinue reading “Seminar: Alternative Histories of Judicial Review”

Women as Model Minority Judges: The Case of Indonesia

On 21 January 2021, the Oxford Programme in Asian Laws series will host a seminar by Melissa Crouch on ‘Women as Model Minority Judges in Indonesia’. Registration for the seminar is open here. Serving the world’s third largest democracy, Indonesia’s Constitutional Court has been crucial to the past two decades of reform and the shift fromContinue reading “Women as Model Minority Judges: The Case of Indonesia”

Symposium: Women in the Judiciary

The International Association for Constitutional Law (IACL-AIDC) blog is featuring a guest symposium this month on Women in the Judiciary. For the posts, follow the links below Melissa Crouch, Guest Symposium on Women in the Judiciary Imelda Deinla, Women judges and the rise and fall of Philippine democracy Anna Dziedzic, Women judges, local judges, foreignContinue reading “Symposium: Women in the Judiciary”

Australia and Asia: Regulatory Perspectives on continuity and change

A conference on Australia and Asia, Regulatory Perspectives, hosted by Monash Business School, Governance and Regulation Research Network (GARNET) and the Asia-Pacific Regulation Research Group, will be held on Wednesday 17thNovember 2021 Contributing to Veronica Taylor’s 1997 edited volume Asian Laws Through Australian Eyes (Sydney, LBC Information Services), Malcolm Smith presented Australians as largely ignorantContinue reading “Australia and Asia: Regulatory Perspectives on continuity and change”